Conservation expert to be appointed to manage one of Europe’s rarest landscapes

A conservation expert is to be appointed to manage one of the rarest landscapes and habitats in Europe - the East Devon Pebblebed Heaths.

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Conservation expert to be appointed to manage one of Europe’s rarest landscapes

The network of seven commons and one moor span 2,800 acres between Exeter and Budleigh Salterton on the Jurassic Coast and are one of the largest remaining areas of lowland heath in England.

Clinton Devon Estates, owners of the East Devon Pebblebed Heaths are seeking a Site Manager who “has a real passion for wildlife conservation”, to help safeguard this internationally important conservation site which is situated within East Devon’s Area of Outstanding Natural Beauty.

Reporting to the Estates’ Head of Wildlife and Conservation, the new Site Manager will play a leading role in the protection and management of the Heaths which is recognised as a Site of Special Scientific Interest (SSSI), a Special Area of Conservation Area (SAC) and a Special Protection Area (SPA). The site provides a home to over 3,000 species, including Dartford Warbler, Nightjar and Southern Damselfly.

As a registered charity, the Pebblebed Heaths Conservation Trust, established by Clinton Devon Estates over 10 years ago, manages the heaths to ensure all wildlife associated with the heathland flourishes, whilst protecting public access and promoting responsible public enjoyment of the site.

In this new position, the Site Manager will play a pivotal role in protecting and maintaining this unique stretch of the Devon whilst promoting its value and helping to enrich the lives of the public who use it. As Open Access land, the Pebblebed Heaths are highly valued by society for recreation, with dog walking, horse riding and cycling being popular pastimes.  

The Pebblebed Heaths Conservation Trust works alongside and in partnership with a number of public and private organisations such as the Ministry of Defence – as the land is used as the primary training site for the Royal Marines – District and County Councils, RSPB, Devon Wildlife Trust and East Devon AONB.

Dr Sam Bridgewater, Head of Wildlife and Conservation at Clinton Devon Estates said: “We are looking for someone with significant practical experience managing similar sites of high international standing to join our existing highly dedicated and experienced team. This will be a demanding but highly fulfilling role managing one of the country’s most important wildlife areas.

“The right candidate must have a real passion for conservation, be able to demonstrate significant knowledge of species and habitat management and understand the principles of site governance. They must also be able to reconcile the needs of wildlife with the thousands of people who use and enjoy the reserve on a daily basis. “The new Site Manager will also act as a public facing representative for the Heaths. Part of their role will be liaising with, and and reporting to statutory bodies and ensuring that the Conservation Trust continues to develop with public and government support.”

Click here to view the full job specification.

…and the Lord Clinton was, by the whole Council, brought to the King’s presence, who after like thanks was given, was pleased that he should be made High Admiral of England and one of his Privy Council…

– Official record of appointment of 9th Baron Clinton as Lord High Admiral for life on 4th May 1550

to set out against the Scots, the King’s enemies and rebels

– Instructions given by Edward 1 to John de Clinton on 8th April 1298, prior to him leading the Royal army to victory at the Battle of Falkirk. As a direct result the Clinton Barony was formed on 22nd July 1299

We are trustees for life of the countryside

– 22nd Baron Clinton, 2002

Do what you can to elevate your profession. It is an honourable one

– Robert Lipscomb, Steward 1865 – 1892

But our power for good or evil in this world’s affairs in a countryside is enormous

– Robert Lipscomb, Steward 1865 – 1892